Keeping Dogs in Logan

Consultation has concluded

UPDATED August 2019

We are reviewing our dog keeping local laws and this is the second round of community engagement.

From March to May 2019, we asked you to Have Your Say on our current cat and dog keeping local laws. We received 2,346 responses in total, 1,228 were specific to keeping dogs in Logan.

We asked about the following topics:

  • General dog keeping requirements, including;
  • The number of dogs you should be able to keep on your property
  • Effective control of dogs
  • Dog enclosures/fencing requirements

Did we hear you correctly?

All insights from the first round of engagement have been considered and now we want to hear from you again. You can have your say by:

Also, don't forget to let us know if you provided feedback during the first round of community engagement by participating in our quick poll.

You have until September 15 to Have Your Say.

UPDATED August 2019

We are reviewing our dog keeping local laws and this is the second round of community engagement.

From March to May 2019, we asked you to Have Your Say on our current cat and dog keeping local laws. We received 2,346 responses in total, 1,228 were specific to keeping dogs in Logan.

We asked about the following topics:

  • General dog keeping requirements, including;
  • The number of dogs you should be able to keep on your property
  • Effective control of dogs
  • Dog enclosures/fencing requirements

Did we hear you correctly?

All insights from the first round of engagement have been considered and now we want to hear from you again. You can have your say by:

Also, don't forget to let us know if you provided feedback during the first round of community engagement by participating in our quick poll.

You have until September 15 to Have Your Say.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • Everyone is talking about the appropriate fencing. We need to define what that is. Does it change with the size of the dog or the size of the land the dog or dogs are kept on.

    Butch68 asked about 1 month ago

    Great question Butch68 - thanks for asking. Yes, there are fencing requirements in the Local Laws (Subordinate Local Law 4.1 (Animal Management)) for dogs . Whilst the law doesn't define the material the fence should be made of, it needs to constructed with strong and firm building materials that prevent the dog/s from escaping over, under or through the fence. The fenced space can't be less than 10M2 and must be a minimum of 1.2 metres in height from the ground. For dogs that weigh less than 10kg, the fence must be a mimum of 1 metre in height. If a dog has previously jumped the fence and escaped the property, the fence must be a minimum of 1.8 metres high. Most developing areas have a standard fence height of 1.8 metres as this also acts as a privacy barrier from neighbouring properties. Regulated dogs (dangerous and menacing) are exempt from the above as they have strict keeping and enclosure requirements.

  • why does council bother to have application forms for housing more dogs with hidden criteria not listed on the form? i applied for a recreational breeder license and was told no way unless my dogs are mains registered and doing showing or agility etc - nothing about that on the form i was given - who decided to make you all lord over us? if you meet the criteria on the form and aren’t a nuisance to neighbours or creating waste hazards, it’s got nothing to do with council - you should be approved. if you don’t agree with breeding, tough - it’s not up to you to rule our lives

    Nunya asked about 1 month ago

    Thanks for sharing your opinion Nunya. This is exactly why we have this forum, so we can capture eveyrone's voice. There are no hidden criteria on the animal keeping approval application.  This form is completed if you're wanting to keep additional animals that exceed the allowable number for your property size.  You mentioned a recreational breeding approval which is a completley different application.  The State Act including puppy breeding legislation (by which Council abides) sates that anyone wishing to breed (intentioanlly or accidentally) must have a Supply Number or Breeder Identification Number (BIN).  You can apply for a Supply Number online and it's free. There are also conditions which a breeder must adhere to when breeding. Breeders are also required to microchip and register the puppies at 12 weeks of age with their local council.  Anyone found breeding puppies without a Supply Number of BIN may face substantial fines up to $26,000. This law took effect 26 May 2017.  For more information: https://qdbr.daf.qld.gov.au/.  Council also has recreational animal keeping approvals for residents who want to show or compete their dogs in agility trials and the like. Again, this is a different approval application. 

  • I believe the statement about picking up after the dog is to general. You need to be more specific. Some might think you just talking about the dogs toys etc instead of their excrement or poo.

    ChrisT asked about 2 months ago

    Great suggestion ChrisT! Thanks for sharing.

  • How can you take a dog, that is well loved and well looked after because the land size is ‘too small’. Our puppies are allowed inside, we spend all the time we can with them, they are walked daily.

    Bugden22 asked about 2 months ago

    Hi Budgen 22. Council's existing Local Laws require an owner to obtain an approval to keep a dog on small property lots (0 to 300m2). You can keep one dog without an approval on properties 301-499m2 and apply for an approval to keep 2. We're currently reviewing this. Community feedback suggests that 1 dog could be kept without an approval on smaller properties (0-350m2) including units, flats and townhouses. The community also suggested that 2 dogs could be kept without an approval on properties 351-500m2. We'd like to know what you think about this suggestion.